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Please select the captioned service in order to meet your requirement! For those that aren’t familiar with the system, the first 2 years of medical school (in the US at least) are “pre-clinical” years, where future physicians learn the ‘basic science’ behind medicine.

By the end of third year, medical students need to know what they want to be “when they grow up”.That’s when you have to start getting ready for “The Match”, the process in which medical students and residency programs rank their respective top picks and a computer determines their destiny (think of it as speed dating meets arranged marriage).No- the people I was working with are not “just dumb trauma surgeons” as one of our attending physicians liked to self-deprecatingly refer to he and his collegues, but they are men (and women) of action.There is a standard protocol that you run through when a trauma comes in, the “ABCs” (Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Disability, Exposure (yes, if you come into the trauma bay, you will lose your clothes)), but when something needs to be done, a trauma surgeon does not stand on protocol and wait for the final assessment.The removal of large portions of bowel because of diverticulitis, appendices and gallbladders removed around the clock, amputations because of uncontrolled diabetes…

It all seems so unnecessary (for the most part) if we figured out how to live within the confines of how our body evolved to thrive.There’s a lot to be learned in third year (there is a very steep learning curve when you finally step foot on the floors), and each clerkship (Psychiatry, Neurology, General Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Family Medicine, and Pediatrics) requires the acquisition of new clinical skills and knowledge.The idea, obviously, isn’t to make you a surgeon in 2 months, but to give you some basic knowledge in these fields and to give you an idea of what it is like to be a physician in each of these specialties.As I come off my surgery rotation, now a third of the way through my third year of medical school, it seems like an appropriate time to take a look at the clerkships past, and to glance forward to those awaiting me.I started with Neurology- a very cerebral specialty (pun intended), where, at least when I spent my time with the stoke team, we spent a lot of time doing very thorough histories and physicals, teasing out the specific deficits and abnormalities of a patient’s presentation to determine (“localize” is the medical term) where in the brain there was an issue.Those that aren’t daft enough to take a hiatus to do a Ph D (and when those of us that were daft enough finally come back) then start clinical clerkships in the third year.