Reseaarch on dating violence

Break the Cycle is proud to have been granted the Love is Not Abuse campaign from Fifth and Pacific (formerly Liz Claiborne, Inc.).

It is thus with great pleasure that we present their years of hard work and research excellence: finds that a significant majority of corporate executives and their employees from the nation's largest companies recognize the harmful and extensive impact of domestic violence in the workplace, yet only 13% of corporate executives think their companies should address the problem.

Bullying may inflict harm or distress on the targeted youth including physical, psychological, social, or educational harm.

This article provides a critical review of the research literature with respect to risk factors for both perpetrators and victims of dating violence and examines the research on the effectiveness of prevention and intervention programs.

Risk factors have been defined as "attributes or characteristics that are associated with an increased probability of [its] reception and/or expression" (Hotaling & Sugarman, 1990 p. Risk factors are correlates of dating violence and not necessarily causative factors.

It occurs in heterosexual and same-sex relationships and cuts across racial/ethnic and socio economic lines.

Although there are methodological problems accurately determining prevalence rates, a conservative estimate is that one in three adolescents has experienced physical or sexual violence in a dating relationship (Avery-Leaf, Cascardi, O'Leary, & Cano, 1997).

These rates are higher when verbal abuse is included in the definition.

Teen dating violence appears to parallel violence in adult relationships in that it exists on a continuum ranging from verbal abuse to rape and murder (Sousa, 1999).

The majority of these programs have focused on increasing students' awareness and knowledge about dating violence, changing attitudes and norms that condone violence, and building conflict resolution and communication skills.

Given that many of these prevention programs have only been short-term interventions, the results are particularly encouraging and demonstrate a potential to impact public health.

CDC works to understand and prevent bullying before it starts.

Research is still developing and helps us to better understand and prevent bullying.

Fundamental problems exist, however, in asserting gender parity regarding relationship violence.